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20121201
20121231
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SFGTV2 1233
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English 1233
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,233 (some duplicates have been removed)
and 1 us have come to this area because we can walk to this area and there are business and is ago lighting designer in the area that we are working with right now on a lighting project. so there is a few other things that we have written down that i just wanted to point out there is about 60 design professionals in the western sonoma area and about 40 within the valley area and so we would like to stay, continue and continue to grow our businesses there. >>> good afternoon commissioners my name is jeffery miller with miller company architect i want to follow up on the previous speaker i have a business that has been there for 50 years and in my building there are several interior designers and lighting designers my wife is a designer who has a space had the building as well. we actually share facilities copy machines and thing like that, that we cross fertilize, it seems that we are part of the creative density of the area and having designers, landscape architects and argument connects architects and interior poem shrewded from the area i do not understand that. i have been to
. and how they use the network is the use of the connect feature to send messages. her daughter can send messages to everybody in the network letting them know how she is doing. they used to the calendar to schedule appointments and organize rides. they use the shared tasks and goals to organize larger events. for example, when joe was released from the hospital, she was unable to get back into her home because she could not get up the stairs anymore. they used the network to build her a ramp on saturday afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social networking, and it is designed to create man
up the stairs anymore. they used the network to build her a ramp on saturday afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social networking, and it is designed to create many relationships. this is closed and personal, it is an intimate space. i have a daughter that was close to 1000 facebook friends. it has no advertisements. no data mining, it is private and secure. it bridges the formal and informal world of care and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and y
would like to call up two of our committee members on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community in
world of care and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on the upper side where you have a health care provider to put information into her fault about her health care. if you have heard daughter using the mobile application to update people on the go. you have the neighbor that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want
that overlaps with the western soma plan, so to the extent that we have the information available to us we analyze with the eir and approximate regard to that the western soma is adequate. the central corridor eir will look at that in much more detail than we were able to do so certainly the ah nalis will be before you in the future. >> thank you. i appreciate that and i think the rest of my comments be best taken up during the approval of the plan itself, and they have to do with the zoning and it does have to do with the historic structures and whether they have more flexible uses, but i don't believe those are environmental issues at this time. >> commissioner sugaya. >> yeah, i move to certify. >> second. >> all on motion to certify the final environmental report want commissioner. >> 50eur. >> commissioner. >> aye. >> commissioner. >> aye. >> commissioner. >> aye. commissioner. >> aye. >> and commissioner president fong. >> aye. >> so moved commissioners. that passes unanimously. >> and places you under item 11 western soma community plan adoption actions that include adoption of cal
work with staph to do that as soon as your direction to us is clear even if we don't have that specific language right now. >>> right so if that is the case, then we will include that property alone. >> commissioner hillis. >> i'm trying to get more information on the 601 project and i guess we don't have it here but i know, i do not need to get excited because it's an academy of art and so i don't know what it is or why they have applied for a c eu because what would happen if we approved this? >>> there is some may be we asked them to apply for a c u. >> i don't remember if which asked them to apply for the c u. >>> for all of the proposed --. >> yeah, this is their architecture program this is my understanding and it's in a building in a relatively new building. i don't remember it's only a few years old. my only --. >> so what happened to that c u at this point? >>> it would become invalid you could not approve a probability there. if you passed this pro vision that says that educational institutions are no longer permitted in the sally, you could not legalize t
to add to that? >> yes, they're called a clean circuit. you use the m.c. cable or 12-three, 12-2, the whole circuit. the computer or the microwave. >> so if you can probably do it, it sounds like putting in some kind of metal conduit-clad cable or something that will really reduce the interference. read for me what all these little things mean here. let's tip it up a little bit. >> priority a.w.g. 6-3 type s.o.o. w 600 volt sunlight and water resistant. >> which means what? >> it means it's a cord rather than a cable or wire. the cord is not to be used for permanent wiring. this is a cord that is designed for temporary power. >> it's a big cord. >> it is, it's 50 amp. >> what do they mean when they say primary? >> i don't know what it means. american wire gauge, the six is the size of the aware, the 3 is the three conductors, the type s.o.o.w., that's extra hard use cord. the w stand for wet. 600 volts is the volts it's good for and in the sun and underwater. it's 90 degrees centigrade-rated. it can run as high as 180 degrees without deterioration. this can get really hot. >> w
and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that
torrez to join us again on stage, joaquin will be introducing the mayor and if i can ask my fellow committee members to also join us on stage. joaquin. >> thank you very much i have to say as director the mayor's oches of neighborhood services it's refreshing to have a mayor so dedicated to couldn't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now
is suppose to be doing all of us. thank you all and thank you all our community for support. >> thank you very much. i want to take a few moments to thank all of the organizers tonight. and also, to make sure that we recognize those sponsors who is been quite quite generous with their support for this arab heritage month celebration here in city hall they are p g and e. eleven narrow and bar two. many many of the media outreach worked throughout the community to make sure that people were in union square at the celebrations and if he is activities. (applause). yes mis. >> i was fortunate enough to join the opening of the festival at the castro theater and i can't thank them enough for making us all aware of that work as well and,phd has been a kind sponsor with the coffee which we all know keeps us awake and ice -- which keeps us well well fed. yes, please give it up. and we all know the work that takes place, here to allow all of us to enjoy the city like this could not be wad without a very strong organizing work of our planning committee and so to all of you i w
stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i tell them whatever i know. my kno
us continue that very nice title we have, the innovation capital of the world. and i am here today in collaboration with board president david chiu and so many others from our committee on information technology, spur, our different various city departments, really trying to improve on what we've done already. back in 2009 then mayor gavin newsome to the light of all of us had introduced that we ought to really establish some guidelines to open up our city's data. and in the year later, the board, less legislation, the first open data legislation in san francisco that made us cutting edge throughout the country, the first to come out and say to everybody in the public, to people who wanted to create businesses, wanted to look at the city with kind of an open invitation to involve themselves with what the city had. and part of that really neat understanding was that we were holding onto so much of our own data in our own silos with our own very focused obligations that we had, and not realizing that if we had released that data to the public, we could really allow them to help us cr
adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by movi
of the boa of superviss, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quita while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and mh more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget wo
, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity t
. and at the time we were asked to consider an alternative design using concrete rather than the scheme that was potentially planned for previous to that, which was a steel frame structure that used hydraulic dampers to control seismic motion. >> so, i met with my team. we worked hard. we came up with a great idea. let's take out the heavy steel structure, let's put in an innovative vertical post tension concrete structure, great idea. we did that. a lot of other things. and we came up with a price of 140 million. so, we achieved that goal. and, so, when we first started looking at the building, it was going to cost a lot of money. because of the way it was being built, we could only get 12 floors. we wanted more space for our employees. we ended up going and saying, okay, if we do a concrete building instead, which was web core's idea, we can get 13 floors, not 12 floors. the concrete doesn't require much space between the floors as a steel building does. and it could be cheaper. yes, more space, less money, great idea. ♪ ♪ >> we know that right now there are things happening in po
the most essential part of this thing for us to be ready to fight future fires. >> colonel. >> thank you very much for allowing us to come here and participate because it is important. we really appreciate very much this opportunity. we're doing well right now but there's khal lefrpgs we can do better on and that's exactly what we're looking forward to do. we're looking forward to build upon and leverage what we're doing here. communications, that was one of the first things. it's different with our active duty forces because you see here, we send our aircraft all around the world. we can't necessarily just invest in some components in the aircraft and call it good because those assets may be gone and deployed but we have work arounds for that. we are looking forward to that as well in addition to the training. lastly is we again kind of relish the opportunity to participate in the operations against an active enemy. at least here, it's fire. we appreciate the fact we can go ahead and enter a tactical command air control. those are operations that are familiar to us and they are,
us awake and ice -- which keeps us well well fed. yes, please give it up. and we all know the work that takes place, here to allow all of us to enjoy the city like this could not be wad without a very strong organizing work of our planning committee and so to all of you i want to say thank you again again and particularly again to shad dee alcarra. who's-who really has been a beakon of energy inside of our office at the mayor's office and neighborhood service and is sweating through our work to make sure we are well on point to have a great celebration here at city hall and so again shad dei thank you very much for your work. to all of you here tonight from the city family i want to saw thank you for joining us here as well and to really encourage you to take part of in all of the if he istivities that we have to offer here at city hall and for those of you who have an opportunity to tine sign in at the front please do so we can reach you through the mayor's office and neighborhood services center which highlights the many services and if he is activities that occur in san
. >> and then my second question, i just wanted to clarify something or bring it to your attention, a lot of us here today work for the administration in this building which is actually is a pump station still in use that uses diesel pumps to pump the water from the ocean so it's not just a fire house, it's also us being exposed to diesel exhaust, and so with you mentioned this gal, rachel, is she the person who's not here today, or when you were talking about the air quality, having your air quality tested, and the odd thing is now a different agency runs and maintains these pumps that are right beneath us now so it gets kind of complicated, but i think i've been exposed, i worked at the airport for 11 years and then worked here, i have this exposure to diesel smell that you don't notice it here, i do notice it frequently, and so when you mention this gal rachel. >> so, just before this, we had a meeting because we're working on hopefully building a study to look at exposures among women in the fire course to understand what they're exposed to, this raises a really interesting kind of unique s
that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with our tenants. it's an honor to have you guys here. enjoy the day and it's an honor to welcome jane back to the hatchery. (applause) >> good morning, my nam
in 1952 in the beacon hill neighborhood of seattle, washington. his parents immigrated to the u.s. from china and the 1930's. his father fought in world war ii and worked as a cook. he passed away when the mayor was 15. his mother was a seamstress and a waitress. mayor lee has five siblings, he graduated from college in maine, he also went to uc- berkeley law school and finished in 1978. he and his wife have two daughters. i also want to mention, prior to becoming mayor, one of the key points in his contributions to the community is after he completed law school, he worked as a managing attorney for the san francisco asian law caucus, where he was an advocate for affordable housing and the rights of immigrants and renters. mayor lee -- [applause] >> thank you. welcome to city hall. the people's city hall, san francisco. i want you all to note that that was such a wonderful rendition of our national anthem. please give another applause to the millennium -- melanie and her daughter. i am so excited about all of you and seen so many of you from all over our state. come to city hall anin sa
within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,233 (some duplicates have been removed)